Pseudo Scottish Terrier survives rottweiler attack

The Limerick Post in Ireland reports the story as told by Blackie’s 65-year-old owner Gene McGuane:

“I left Blackie outside for a wee, like I do every evening and when I went to let him back in, the Rottweiler came bounding down after him.
“He went for him full force and started tearing him around the road, he rolled him over and started biting his stomach,” a distraught Gene told the Limerick Post. She said she was horrified by the shrill barking of the dog when it was attacked.

Blackie was rushed to the vet and stitched up after the attack. It looks like he’ll recover from his wounds although, from the photo accompanying the article, it’s not clear he’s actually a Scottish Terrier.

Get well, Blackie, no matter what kind of dog you are.

16 thoughts on “Pseudo Scottish Terrier survives rottweiler attack

  1. Get well Blackie.

    Thank God…your mom Gene was there to protect you.It had to be particularly horrifying watching your baby get attached and listening to those screams.

    I know. Been there done that.

    When my Scottie was only 10 months only. I was walking to my car with the Scotty in tow on a lead,……when out of nowhere this 120lb chow mix (off lead) came barreling down and attacked my wee lass. I will never forget that moment. It took 3 of us pulling and kicking the big dog get off of my Scottie.

    After a few bandages, and some meds she was fully recovered within a few weeks.

    I understand how you must feel…..You feel helpless. And that moment of attack is only a matters of seconds, but it’s like hours in your mind.

    Today, I carry mace. It won’t hurt the dog and it keeps me and my Scottie safe.

    Blessings and well wishes to Blackie.

    1. As much as I hate to say it – a handgun will put the problem to rest once and for all. I tried pepper spray and found it ineffective on hyper agressive dogs. There is not a chance in hell I will standby and merely feel ‘helpless’ during an attack.

      I have had my go arounds with loose dogs when out with my properly licensed and leashed Scotties. The local police and county animal control are overpaid worthless morons – which is why I mention the do it yourself method.

  2. im not sure if this is an English thing, but I dont advocate using handguns on other dogs as I think ypou are possibly going to end up in a heap of trouble. I know it can be very scary when your dog is attacked by another but ts certainly not worth being gaoled for!

  3. I’m with you, Claire. Especially since there have been a few well-publicized cases of cops shooting dogs without good cause recently. I think a gun just adds fuel to the fire.

    Ken, do you really pack heat at the dog park?

    1. As I said many times before, I refuse to take my Scotties to dog parks, so, the answer to Ann is no. The bark parks I have seen in my town are lawless and too often visited by punks with their vicious pitbulls. Irresponsible homeowners bring their stressed dogs to the park and allow them to wreck havoc. My personal opinion is bark parks are a waste of resources.

      However, as many of you may not know, Arizona now allows concealed carry without a permit. Like tens of thousands of law abiding Arizonans, I carry a firearm everywhere I believe there is a necessity.

      Ann, your comment about guns ‘adding fuel to the fire’ is unpersuasive, misplaced, and based upon myths. (See end of message)

      The recent events of police officers committing ‘Canicide’ is not and can not be related to the lawful carry of firearms.

      Police are out of control. Their militaristic attitudes are reflected in their shoot first attitude, particularly towards dogs. These low esteem cops barge into houses, often the wrong house, and immediately deem any dog in the house a threat and execute it.

      Police are shooting dogs for no reasons. Reports tell of cops jumping a fence, looking for a person who may have run into YOUR yard but rather than find the trespasser, they come across your Scottie and KILL IT. WHY? Because the coward cop tells his supervisors he/she was in ‘fear for his/her safety’ and decided to kill the dog.

      Do you know how many police officers end up having to pay for their dastardly shootings of dogs. ZERO.

      MY biggest fear in my city is NOT my Scotties being attacked by another dog, rather, its being killed by a local cop.

      So I say to the useless animal groups (regularly begging for money), such as the Humane Society of the United States, PETA, and others, where is your outrage over the almost universal policy of police shooting dogs for the fun of it? You and your organizations are so busy collecting money under the false ruse of saving animals (which none of you have done) that you have failed to say a word about Canicide by Cop.

      Back to the story at hand. The Rottweiler attack. I realize that this happened in England, a country which has chosen to disarm its citizens and remove any vestige of the right of self defense from its citizens. It is unfortunate that anyone would find an excuse not to protect their Scotties (WHAT, YOU CARRY A GUN?).

      Yes Ann, I carry a firearm as do hundreds of thousands of law abiding citizens AND legal residents in Arizona and millions across the United States. 48 states have passed laws allowing concealed carry. I fully realize this sounds abhorrent to those living in countries where the public has been turned into a victim society by their government leaders.

      As for me and my Scotties – they are safe with me. However, the two thugs who beat my wife nearly to death in a robbery in 2002 and turned her into a parapalegic wouldn’t be with us if either me or an armed citizen had been close by.

      Robert Heinlein is quoted thusly: “And armed soceity is a polite soceity. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life”.

      A 2010 survey conducted by the National Association of Chiefs of Police (NACOP) asked police officers if general recognition throughout the states of ccw permits issued by a state, in the way drivers’ licenses are recognized throughout the country, would facilitate the violent crime-fighting potential of the professional law enforcement community, 77 percent said yes.

      “The survey upends the propaganda of anti-gun organizations and individuals that gun rights and police interests are not compatible,” says Snyder, also a board member of the American Federation of Police and Concerned Citizens.

      “In fact,” he believes, “the very opposite is the case. The survey shows that over 70 percent of the chiefs and sheriffs think that qualified, law-abiding armed citizens can be of assistance to the professional law enforcement community in promoting justice and reducing the incidence of violent criminal activity.

      1. well im sure Anne’s comment about “packing heat” was more jovial in it’s intention but she seems to have roused somewhat of a reaction in you. I accept that different laws have different views re guns and their usage. However, I’m not certain such an angry individual should be carrying a weapon! Also slightly insulting to assume us, non gun toting English folk wouldnt jump at the chance to protect our scotties!

        1. “I’m not certain such an angry individual should be carrying a weapon!”

          A comment certainly expected of someone who knows absolutely nothing about American culture and is pathethically blinded by centuries of a paternalistic culture which has reduced a once proud country to second class status when it comes to the protection of individual liberty and freedom.

          My wife and I hardly consider our 45, yes, 45 years of service as members of a law enforcement agency inapposite to our opinions.

          I am a landowner on Skye. I am well acquanted with British customs and traditions. Although I love my ancesteral heritage, your opinion, expressed above, which is all too common on the Isles is one of the reasons we choose not to live there.

          I continue to question though,why, any person who walks their Scottie, KNOWING in advance there is a threat in the neighborhood, yet takes their dog into that environment anyway. My opinion is that is irresponsible pet ownership.

          I know Ann publishes these stories on a regular basis but the ‘rest of the story’ should be told too, and that is, what caused the attack, and did the owner contribute in an irresponsible manner to the Scottie’s predicament.

      2. Whoa, I take Sunday off and it’s open fire in the comments.

        Ken,

        I know the gun issue is more complex than a lot of anti-gun advocates make it out to be. And I’ve heard the argument that armed societies are safer made before by people I respect. That said, I still come down on the anti-gun side of the issue.

        Claire,

        Having got to know Ken through the Scottie News, I think I can say that he’s not an angry person, but rather a passionate one — and clearly not just about Scottie Rescue but about guns as well. And you’re right, packing heat was in jest.

        Brindy,

        I’m not sure if you’re referring to the story I linked. Do you think that Blackie’s owner did something wrong?

        1. Anne

          No, I don’t think Blackie’s owner did anything wrong and I apologize if I gave that impression.

          I believe we are ALL the guardians of our animals. You can assign spiritual or secular reasons for that belief, as appropriate, but nevertheless, it is our duty to ensure the safety of the companions we bring into your homes and our neighbors.

          I spoke about Canicide and the fear that I have our police are out of control in that respect. Well, today, here in Maricopa County (AZ) we have yet another example of not only Canicide by COP, but the Police Officer was ARRESTED for KILLING the owner of the dog too.

          I’ll cut and paste the azcentral.com article at the end of this message.

          If we can not trust our police oficers, or, our neighbors with dogs, then WHOM are we to trust? The answer is, sadly, just ourselves.

          In some jurisdictions (I realize the UK, Canada and most other countries have different belief systems about firearms) the defense of our animals ends up being deadly force. Why? Because of irresponsible pet ownership.

          The story on the lead of this web site today was two Westie’s attacked by Pit Bulls. I won’t jump to the conclusion about this being a UK problem because I know it isn’t.

          I stand by my position, and so too does our US Supreme Court, that the 2nd Amendment guarantees the right to bear arms is a protected right or every American citizen and legal resident. As I go about my business day to day, I routinely see people with firearms and I give it nary a thought.

          Ken McLeod

          Now, here is a cut and paste of a sad ending to a human and a dog at the hands of a Phoenix Police Officer. A link to the actual article is at the end of the message.
          —————————————
          A Phoenix police officer who fatally shot a domestic violence suspect during a Tuesday altercation at a south Phoenix trailer park has been arrested on suspicion of aggravated assault, according to police records.

          Officer Richard Chrisman, 36, was taken into custody at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday following the midday shooting southeast of Central Avenue and Baseline Road, police booking records show.

          • Police fatally shoot domestic violence suspect

          Chrisman made his initial court appearance Wednesday morning at Maricopa County Fourth Avenue Jail. His bond was set at $150,000 and his next court date was set for Oct. 18.

          A probable cause statement for Chrisman’s arrest detailed how the officer “drew his service pistol and placed the muzzle of the pistol” against the suspect’s head during an argument that preceded a fight and fatal shooting.

          The suspect in Tuesday’s shooting died at the scene, inside the home where Chrisman and another officer had responded to an emergency call about noon.

          Danny Frank Rodriguez, 29, was involved in a criminal-damage incident inside his mother’s trailer home before the shooting, Phoenix police Sgt. Tommy Thompson said during a Wednesday news conference.

          Chrisman and his partner, Officer Sergio Virgillo, used a Taser and pepper spray to subdue Rodriguez before the fatal shooting, according to the records.

          The struggled continued, and as Rodriguez tried to leave the trailer on his bicycle, Virgillo said Chrisman “drew his pistol again, raised it up toward Daniel and shot Daniel from a distance of about two or three feet,” records show.

          In his statements to investigators, Virgillo said his partner shot Rodriguez’s dog, though it had not been set upon the officers.

          Chrisman is a nine-year veteran on patrol for Phoenix Police South Mountain Precinct.

          The Phoenix police investigation into the shooting is ongoing, Thompson said. A second police news conference was scheduled for Wednesday afternoon.

          Phoenix Public Safety Manager Jack Harris is also meeting with south Phoenix community leaders before the news conference.

          The case is under review by Phoenix police internal affairs detectives, homicide detectives and the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office.

          Phoenix police in the city’s South Mountain Precinct have come under public scrutiny this year by City Councilman Michael Johnson and members of the south Phoenix community in the wake of a March incident in which Johnson accused a patrol officer of violating his civil rights.

          Johnson, a former Phoenix homicide detective and the lone African-American member of the City Council, wants a citizen panel similar to those in other major cities with the authority to recommend police discipline or subpoena powers to bring officers before a citizen review board for questioning.

          Johnson commended Officer Virgillo, 41, a 14-year veteran, for “coming forward” and “telling the truth” about the shooting.

          “We have some officers in that South Mountain Precinct that are abusing their authority,” Johnson said. “If these allegations are true … it’s just a continuation of allegations made against officers in that precinct.”

          The Phoenix Police Professional Standards Bureau, the internal-affairs office investigating Chrisman’s case, recently announced its plans to develop a proposal for an “educational-based discipline” program to handle some of the non-violent complaints about rude behavior and other lower-level misconduct. The department is also considering a mediation process to bring residents and officers together to resolve complaints.

          Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/community/phoenix/articles/2010/10/06/20101006phoenix-police-officer-in-fatal-shooting-arrested06-ON.html#ixzz11cPbEKki

  4. my comment was never meant to offend and was really only meant to reiterate that, although there are things we are all passionate about it is my personal belief that guns don’t solve the problem. I openly admit I do not have much experience re American culture but I’m certainly aware of the problems weaponary can cause due to my experience as a nurse in an emergency care setting and with relatives who work within the police force and magistrates courts. I do agree about the problem of not being able to defend your own land/home and we have seen a spate of incidents where individual’s who have tried to protect their propery being prosecuted for using, what has been deemed unecessary force against people threatening their home but I’m not sure how this could be resolved. Dont let my opinions put you off living on Skye as one thing we could probably agree on (other than the love of our scotties) is that it’s landscape is very beautiful.

    1. My ancestors were crofters (what else) on Skye. The entire family was broken up during the Clearances. My great-grandfather was sent to Newfoundland as a small boy. Fortunately he refused to cooperate with the Lords who felt their crofters were vermin and made his way back to Skye well late in life. He convinced a landowner to sell him property north of Dunvegan as a freehold and it has been in our family ever since.

      The problem is that grandad, a british citizen, joined the US Army to fight in Europe. After the war he became a US citizen but was required to swear away his allegience to the Crown. I still have the papers he signed.

      So, although we are landowners, we are not citizens and the UK, much like the US, really does not want retirees immigrating to their country. We can only come as visitors staying 6 months at a time.

      There are a few relatives still on Skye that would allow my three brothers and I to apply for dual citizenship under the ‘relatives’ provisions but the process is a pain.

  5. I am going to have to side with Ken on this one. I see the point that there are many cases where people with concealed carry permits have been hurt or misused, but sadly I have heard more cases where police have accidentally shot themselves or someone else. It is a dangerous weapon, so of course you are going to have issues.

    However, as for the “angry person” carrying the gun, there are laws in place to keep it from a random person who just gets mad at a dog or another person from going out and getting a gun. Many of these safety precautions include a waiting list to actually get a gun and in many states, a waiting period to actually get the license with a background check required.

    As for not needing a gun, sometimes it is the only thing that will get through to an red eyed dog. I remember on multiple occasions growing up, we were just right out of town where many people decided to drop off their “unwanted” dogs. Most of them had a very aggressive temper, and they would make it to our house. Thankfully at that point we are were out of city limits and had a gun on hand. Most of the time, a bb gun would suffice.

    I don’t believe, by any means, that you can always know what you are walking into and can always know where to walk to keep your Scottie out of harms way. On a very similar path, I don’t believe there is any way to completely know that there is not going to be any danger in your way today. In the US where there are multiple massive shootings ranging from schools to businesses to churches every year, the only thing you can think of is protecting yourself. In every case I have heard lately, there is always a comment made by someone of law that the incident would have been adverted, or was stopped by someone with a concealed carry permit.

    Yes there are downfalls to the idea of a concealed weapon, but sometimes it is necessary.

    On another note think of this predicament: What if the lady Gene had her grandchild out playing in the yard and the Rottwieler decided to attack. 65-year old Gene can not get the dog off of her grandchild by physical means, but has a gun close by. Would you accept the death of the grandchild, or would you reach for the gun?

  6. To Ann’s non-American readers, I would just like to say that some of the US fan base are deliberately staying out of this discussion!

    1. Really (staying out)? Why would that be? Open and frank discussion is the hallmark of a free society.

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